How Mobile is Your Top Talent?

Posted on Tue, May 15th, 2018

Traditionally, the number one motivation for employees to relocate was money. Today, however, there is a newly emerging workforce that is motivated by more. A workforce that values happiness and flexibility inside and outside the workplace. For this new workforce, offering more money as an incentive for them to move abroad has become less effective. So, how do these shifts in attitudes and opinions towards relocation play out among senior executive level employees in the food and beverage industry in Africa?

What Influences The Likelihood of Employees To Relocate?

Senior executive level employees have a higher likelihood of moving compared to other demographic groups. The percentage of senior executives who are ‘very likely’ to relocate stands at 24%, which is higher than any other demographic group. However, the number represents a 6% decline from five years ago. (©Copyright BDO IPSOS Mobility Report 2017).

Given a minimum 10% pay increase, 28% of employees from the Middle East and Africa were most inclined to say they are ‘very likely’ to consider relocating temporarily (up to two years) compared to employees from other regions (©Copyright BDO IPSOS Mobility Report 2017). Despite employees from the Middle East and Africa being the second most likely group to consider relocating, these numbers represent a significant decline compared to five years ago.

Of the incumbents most inclined to say they are ‘very likely’ to consider temporary relocation for up to two years with a 10% increase in salary, the Food and Beverage industry comes in tenth place at 24%.

After looking at the above factors that influence the likelihood of employees to relocate, it becomes evident that, despite the increasing unwillingness for employees to relocate, senior executive level employees in the food and beverage industry in Africa are more likely to consider relocating compared to other groups.

Desired Relocation Destinations

Another factor that influences the willingness for employees to relocate is the relocation destination. At 36%, employees from the Middle East and Africa are still more predisposed to relocate to the United States compared to those from other regions.

Identifying the Right Incentives

Employees in senior executive and decision making roles are concerned with job security when presented with relocation offers. However, paid language training and immigration assistance for their families are also attractive incentives for senior executives. It’s also good to note, even when presented with these incentives, senior executives are less likely to relocate today compared to five years ago.

The decision to relocate is also influenced by external factors that are outside the control of the employer, such as government policies. African employees place more emphasis on countries with accessible and high quality education and an innovative economy compared to employees from other regions.

For employers to come up with competitive relocation programs that provide employees with career development opportunities and advance business development and operations, they first need to understand the factors that employees consider when looking for opportunities to relocate for employment. In most cases, when creating employee relocation packages, employers only focus on the cost of moving employees. However, what most forget is that an equally important factor to consider is the willingness of the employee to relocate. It is important for HR managers to first understand the incentives, attitudes and opinions that affect the likelihood of employees to look for employment opportunities in foreign countries. Only by doing so can they come up with the right global mobility programs.

Nicolene Di Bartolo understands the needs of today’s senior executives outside of just financial incentive. We can guide employers based on our experience of appointing executives requiring relocation assistance.  When next you need to attract talent that may require relocation, speak to us.